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100 results found for Sentencing in search category NACDL Website Showing Page 1of 10 Pages: 1 2345678910

Sentencing Reform: Eliminating Mandatory Minimums, Easing Harsh Sentencing Structures and Building Smart on Crime Solutions One State at a Time

Sentencing Reform: Eliminating Mandatory Minimums, Easing Harsh Sentencing Structures and Building 'Smart on Crime' Solutions -- One State at a Time Mary Price

By Mary Price in June 2004
Category: The Champion Magazine
No Need for a Booker Fix (From the President)
There is no need to return to the mandatory federal sentencing regime that the U.S. Supreme Court held unconstitutional in United States v. Booker. The shift to advisory guidelines following Booker has resulted in a more reasonable federal sentencing system.
By Lisa M. Wayne in March 2012
Category: The Champion Magazine
The ‘Silver Tsunami’ And Sentencing — Age and Health as Mitigating Factors

Age and health are significant mitigating factors in an increasing number of sentencings as the baby-boomer generation turns 65 — the so-called “Silver Tsunami.”1 This is particularly true in white collar cases, which disproportionately involve offenders over 50.2 

By Evan A. Jenness in September/October 2013
Category: The Champion Magazine
A Report on Behalf of the American Bar Association Task Force on the Reform Of Federal Sentencing For Economic Crimes

In April 2013, the Criminal Justice Section of the American Bar Association assembled a task force to study and evaluate the reforms needed in the sentencing of federal economic crimes. The mission of the task force was not only to identify the areas of weakness in the existing Federal Sentencing Guidelines, but also to draft and propose a better guideline to remedy those weaknesses.

By James E. Felman in November 2013
Category: The Champion Magazine
Letter to the Editor: Native Americans and Racial Disparities in Sentencing
As a long-time federal judge, I have seen many cases, mostly on appeal, of disparity of federal sentencing toward minorities, sometimes much harsher than on white offenders. The articles you published in July 2013 discussing the problems and possible solutions are timely and significant.
By Hon. Myron H. Bright in November 2013
Category: The Champion Magazine
NACDL News: Bipartisan Reform Legislation On Mandatory Minimum Sentencing Introduced

NACDL News: Bipartisan Reform Legislation On Mandatory Minimum Sentencing Introduced Ivan J. Dominguez and Isaac Kramer NACDL News April 2013 15 On March 20, Senators Patrick Leahy (D-VT) and Rand Paul (R-KY) introduced the Justice Safety Valve Act of 2013 (S. 619). If enacted, this legislation woul

By Ivan J. Dominguez and Isaac Kramer in April 2013
Category: The Champion Magazine
Federal Sentencing Tips

Federal Sentencing Tips Alan Ellis, Todd Bussert, and Mark Allenbaugh April 2013 40 Editor’s Note: This article is based on information in the 2012–14 edition of Federal Prison Guidebook by Alan Ellis (James Publishing). Approximately 94 percent of all federal criminal defendants plead guil

By Alan Ellis, Todd Bussert, and Mark Allenbaugh in April 2013
Category: The Champion Magazine
Sentencing: Here They Go Again: Congress Once More Raises Penalties for Child Pornography Offenses — A Legislative Update

Over the past 20 years, federal and state law enforcement officials have become zealous proponents of child pornography laws that punish such crimes with increasingly severe sanctions. As a result of the routine imposition of mandatory minimums as well as massive Guideline sentences, sex offenders now constitute — for the first time — the fourth largest group of offenders in the Bureau of Prisons, costing the public well over $307 million a year just to house.1 Practitioners, academics, and even the federal judiciary, however, have consistently criticized such a sentencing scheme that results in child pornography offenders receiving sentences exceeding 11 years’ imprisonment, on average, which is far higher than for any other major offense category.2  

By Mark H. Allenbaugh, Zachary Margulis-Ohnuma, Tess Lopez and Fay Spence in November 2012
Category: The Champion Magazine
Challenges for White Collar Sentencing in the Post-Booker Era

Challenges for White Collar Sentencing in the Post-Booker Era John H. Chun, Gregory M. Gilchrist

By John H. Chun, Gregory M. Gilchrist in May/June 2008
Category: The Champion Magazine
Where Procedure Meets Substance: Making the Most of the Need for Adequate Explanation In Federal Sentencing
Some may believe that challenging a district court's sentencing procedure on appeal is not likely to result in better outcomes because the court will simply do a better job on remand addressing arguments and explaining its decision, but still impose the same sentence. But this is not so. When courts of appeals insist that the district courts fully address the evidence and arguments presented by the parties regarding the appropriate sentencing, and then explain their decision to accept or reject those arguments, actual outcomes are different on remand, sometimes significantly so. In exercising the review power accorded to them in Booker and further elucidated in Rita, appellate courts cannot only promote more fair and reasoned sentences in individual cases, but can also exercise a meaningful role in the evolution of the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines envisioned by the Supreme Court. Jennifer Niles Coffin demonstrates that a properly framed appeal resulting in reversal for procedural error under the abuse-of-discretion standard leads more often than not to substantively different results.
By Jennifer Niles Coffin in March 2012
Category: The Champion Magazine
Showing Page 1of 10 Pages: 1 2345678910
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